THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR- “FROM THIS DAY GOING? CHILDISH, CHILDISH”

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Hello, you’re welcome to the summary of the previous week’s WatchYourGrammar lessons. WatchYourGrammar is brought to you by GirdCenter, your guide to correct grammar in English. There were only two lessons for last week; we could not bring you a lesson on Monday, we apologize. We will begin with Wednesday’s discussion. Wednesday’s lesson was a discussion on the actual meaning of the word “CHILDISH.”

“CHILDISH” is an adjective; it means “indicating a lack of maturity”; it does not mean “in the manner of a child.”

When I say “Kofi’s language is childish”, I do not mean that he talks like a little child; I mean his language lacks depth and maturity.

From our discussion, which of these sentences is correct:

“Amma has an adorable CHILDISH giggle”

OR

“Amma has an adorable CHILD-LIKE giggle?”

On Friday, we spoke about the phrase “From this day going.” Let’s look at an example of how this Ghanaian phrase is often used:

“From this day GOING, I’ll put on the lights before I jump onto my bed”, Esi said to Semekor.

In official conversations, what should Esi say in place of “from this day GOING?” Esi can say “from this day FORWARD”, “from now ONWARDS” or “from now ON.”

This is what you should remember: in formal conversations, “from this day FORWARD” is much more appropriate than “from this day GOING.”

This Saturday, 12th November 2016, Gird Center will host Dr. Ọbádélé Kambon and Ms. Ama Akwaa Bernice Akuamoah for our Academic Writing Workshop. The Academic writing workshop is targeted at students and academic professionals. Thinking about how to write that exceptional thesis or statement of purpose? 12th November’s Academic Writing Workshop is your go-to place. Click on this link to register for the Academic writing workshop. http://www.girdcenter.org/gird-writing-camp/register-now/

THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR- “SUPER HOT CANVAS”

Hello there, GirdCenter welcomes you to WatchYourGrammar, your guide to correct grammar in English. We will begin today’s summary of last week’s lessons by drawing a distinction between the nouns “GUIDE” and “GUARD.” “GUIDE” and “GUARD” are different in meaning; they also have a marked difference in pronunciation.

Let’s remember that “GUARDS” and “GUIDES” can be people or inanimate objects. Monday’s lesson focused on people who are referred to as “GUARDS”/ “GUIDES.”

A “GUIDE” is a person whose job is to show people around a place or an institution. A “GUIDE” offers information and explanation to people on a tour. A “GUARD”, on the other hand, is a person who protects or watches over people or property.

Here’s a hint: A “GUIDE” directs, while a “GUARD” protects or defends. Always remember that “GUARD” and “GUIDE” have different meanings.

On Wednesday, we discussed the actual meaning of the noun “CANVAS.”A “CANVAS” is a heavy, closely woven fabric used for clothing, chairs, sails and tents.

We can form this sentence with “CANVAS”: “Afi’s camping tent was made of strong, blue “CANVAS.”

At the end of the lesson we concluded that “CANVAS” is not another name for sneakers; sneakers are shoes made from “CANVAS.”

Friday’s lesson, our final lesson for the week, was an analysis of the word “COMPARISM.”Esi says to Adjo: “You’re making an unfair ‘COMPARISM’ of Kofi’s writing and mine.”

What does Esi really intend to say when she says “COMPARISM?”  The word Esi is looking for is “COMPARISON”, not “COMPARISM.”

Sometimes some Ghanaian speakers of English use “COMPARISM” in place of “COMPARISON.”

It is wrong to say COMPARISM because COMPARISM is not a word in the English dictionary. The right word is COMPARISON, and that is what should be used in formal settings.That’s all for the summary of the previous weeks’s lessons.

This Saturday, November 5, join us for the Business Writing Workshop with Samuel Ameyaw Ntiamoah and Kate Addo. Read more about them here: http://www.girdcenter.org/gird-writing-c…/2016-facilitators/
Young entrepreneurs and corporate professionals who want to add a competitive value to their business communication. Register now: http://www.girdcenter.org/gird-writing-camp/register-now/#GirdWritingCamp2016

 

THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR-“PRIZE THE FOURSQUARE.”

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Welcome to the summary for the previous week’s WatchYourGrammar lessons. WatchYourGrammar is brought to you by GirdCenter, your guide to correct grammar in English. We begin by looking at Monday’s lesson; it was a discussion on the difference between the nouns “PRICE” and “PRIZE.” These words are often used interchangeably, it is however incorrect to use “PRICE” in place of “PRIZE” since the words are different in meaning.

“PRICE” is a noun. It is the descriptive term for the amount of money needed to purchase something. Here’s how we can use PRICE correctly in a sentence: “What is the PRICE of a bag of rice?”

“PRIZE” is a noun as well. It is something given for victory in a contest or competition; it is also what you get for winning a lottery.

Example: She won the Caine “PRIZE” for African writing in 2012 #WatchYourGrammar

“PRICE” and “PRIZE” are pronounced differently; they cannot be used interchangeably because they have different meanings.

Wednesday’s word for discussion was the adjective “NEW AGE.” What do you think is the actual meaning of “NEW AGE?”
“NEW AGE” is a modern spiritual and religious movement that developed towards the end of the 20th century.

This is how it can be used correctly in a sentence: “The ‘NEW AGE’ movement is characterized by spirituality and mysticism.”

Remember, “NEW AGE” does not mean modern or contemporary. Since NEW AGE is not synonymous to modern, it will be incorrect to say “Spoken word is a NEW AGE kind of poetry.”

Our last lesson for the week was on the term “FOURSQUARE.” Esi asked her son Kojo to pick up her phone for her from the dining hall. She told Kojo that the phone was on the “FOURSQUARE” fridge. What does Esi mean by “FOURSQUARE?”

In casual Ghanaian parlance, a “FOURSQUARE” is a square. In formal communication, Esi cannot call a square a “FOURSQUARE.”
It isn’t necessary to add “FOUR” to “SQUARE”; most people already know that squares are four-sided.

That’s all for today’s lesson; enjoy the rest of the day. Our Fiction Workshop with Prof. Ama Ata Aidoo and Dr. Martin Egblewogbe was epic! This Saturday is Creative Nonfiction with Mr. Kobby Graham & Prof Esi Sutherland-Addy. Click on this link to register to be part of the Workshop or call 0206646652 for more information http://www.girdcenter.org/gird-writing-camp/register-now/

THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR – “REMINDER: TERRIFIC POST AHEAD.”

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You are welcome to the summary of last week’s WatchYourGrammar lessons. We start off this week by discussing the differences between two verbs which are often misused. The verbs are “REMIND” and “REMEMBER.”

When you “REMIND” someone of something, you assist by suggesting to them something they have forgotten. You may do this by giving them a cue, or leaving them a note.

On the other hand, to “REMEMBER” is to recall knowledge from memory. When you “REMEMBER”, you recollect. You “REMEMBER” something by yourself; when someone/something causes you to remember something, it is a “REMINDER” (from REMIND)

It is wrong to say: “Kindly REMEMBER me to call Afum tomorrow.” The correct thing to say is: “Kindly REMIND me to call Afum tomorrow.”

What does it mean when someone says she had a “TERRIFIC” idea? This question was posed on Wednesday as we took a look at the actual meaning of “TERRIFIC.”
“TERRIFIC” is an adjective. It means extraordinarily good or great; it is especially used as an intensifier.

For example: “That’s a TERRIFIC idea. You can sleep over at my place so we leave early the next morning.”

“TERRIFIC” can also mean “very great or intense.” For example: “a surgery without anesthesia comes with a TERRIFIC amount of pain.”

“TERRIFIC” is not synonymous to “TERRIBLE”; they cannot be used interchangeably.

On Friday we visited Esi’s compound, where she was having a drink with Addo. Esi is friends with Addo; they have been friends since high school.

Esi calls Addo Shapiro 2; she says that Shapiro 2 is Addo’s “GUY NAME.” What does Esi mean by “GUY NAME?” In Ghana, “GUY NAME” is synonymous to “NICKNAME.” A “NICKNAME” is a substitute for the proper name of a person.

In formal conversation, or in conversations with people who are unfamiliar with Ghanaian parlance, Esi should say “NICKNAME.”

For example: “Addo’s NICKNAME is Shapiro 2. Very few people knew his real name back in school.”

That’s all for this week’s summary of the previous week’s WatchYourGrammar lessons.
Now here’s a TERRIFIC announcement: Gird Writing Camp 2016 is four days away. Register to be a part of this exciting experience by clicking on this link http://www.girdcenter.org/gird-writing-camp/register-now/

THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR- “BOOKLONG PERSONALITY

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You’re welcome to the summary of the previous week’s WatchYourGrammar lessons, brought to you by GirdCenter, your guide to correct grammar in English. Let us begin with Monday’s discussion on the difference between the words “LOSE” and “LOOSE.” These words are sometimes misused in Ghanaian English.

“LOSE” is a verb. It means “fail to keep or to maintain; cease to have, either physically or in an abstract sense.”

For example: Eva ignored most of Joe’s comments. She didn’t want to “LOSE” her temper.

The past tense of “LOSE” is “LOST.” While “LOSE” is a verb, “LOOSE” functions mainly as an adjective. “LOOSE” can function as a verb, a noun or an adverb.

For example: Amma prefers “LOOSE” clothing to tight ones. She says she walks better in “LOOSE” clothes

Here’s a hint: “LOOSE” has nothing to do with being unable to find or keep something.

On Wednesday, we undertook an exercise into finding out the actual meaning of the noun “PERSONALITY.” “PERSONALITY” means “the combination of characteristics or qualities that form an individual’s distinctive character.” Some speakers of English erroneously use “PERSONALITY” as a synonym for person.

This is how PERSONALITY can be used correctly: “Akosua has a really warm PERSONALITY. I feel at home whenever I am with her.” It is incorrect to say “there are several PERSONALITIES in the hallway” if your intention is to say “there are several people in the hallway.”

“PERSONALITY” also means “a celebrity or famous person.” In such a context, we can form a sentence such as this: “Yao’s birthday party hosted three Nollywood personalities.”

Our final lesson for the week was on the word “BOOKLONG.” So Serwaa has very few friends; she wishes she had a few more, however. One day she asks Esi: “Why do people avoid me in the office?” Esi replies: “Serwaa, you’re BOOKLONG; folks don’t like BOOKLONG people very much.”

What does Esi mean by “BOOKLONG?” “BOOKLONG” is a Ghanaian term for a person who is studios and sophisticated; an intellectual. In formal settings, Esi can use “BOOKISH”, “DONNISH” or “HIGHBROW” instead of “BOOKLONG.”

That’s it for this week’s edition of the summary of last week’s lessons. Gird Writing Camp 2016 begins on 22nd October. Find out more about the Camp by clicking on this link http://www.girdcenter.org/gird-writing-camp/ You can register to be part of the Camp by clicking on this link http://www.girdcenter.org/gird-writing-camp/register-now/

THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR-“SAY WHAT? ECONOMICAL OR ECONOMIC?”

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Hi there, you’re welcome to the summary of last week’s lessons on WATCHYOURGRAMMAR, brought to you by Gird Center. Monday’s lesson was a discussion on the differences between the adjectives “ECONOMICAL” and “ECONOMIC.”
Because “ECONOMIC” and “ECONOMICAL” have a common root word, they are often used interchangeably. The words, however, have separate meanings.

“ECONOMIC” means “relating to economics or the economy.”

For example: “his move from his village to the city was influenced by ECONOMIC factors.”

“ECONOMICAL”, on the other hand, means to “use minimum time or resources effectively.”

For example: “texting all night in an examination period will not be an ECONOMICAL use of my time.”

In order to use “ECONOMIC” and “ECONOMICAL” correctly, you will have to remember that both words have distinct meanings and as such cannot be used interchangeably.

What, do you think, is the actual meaning of the adjective “SATISFIED?” On Wednesday, we learned that when someone says they are “SATISFIED”, they mean they are “pleased because they got what they wanted or because something happened in the way that they expected.”

Below are examples of how “SATISFIED” can be used correctly in sentences.

“After re-sitting his Math paper thrice, Boye was finally SATISFIED with his results”.

Another example: “She saw that he had a SATISFIED smile on his face”. Here, “SATISFIED” means “PLEASED.”

When people say they are“SATISFIED”, it doesn’t always mean that they FULL TO SATISFACTION with food. Don’t forget that “SATISFIED” really means “contended or pleased.”

For our final lesson for the previous week, we talked about at the Ghanaianism “GRADUANT”; we tried to find out what it is Esi means to say when she uses this word.

When Esi says “GRADUANT”, what she really means to say is “GRADUAND.” A “GRADUAND” is a person who is about to receive an academic degree.

Esi often says “GRADUANT” instead of “GRADUAND.” However, “GRADUANT” is incorrect; the correct word is “GRADUAND.” Esi has to keep in mind that the correct word to use is “GRADUAND.”

That’s all for the summary of the previous week’s #WatchYourGrammar lessons. Enjoy the rest of the week.

 

THIS WEEK ON WATCHYOURGRAMMAR- “SHE WILL BORN BY ALL MISS”

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Credit: Grammarly.com

 

Hi there, welcome to another summary of the previous week’s lessons on WatchYourGrammar. WatchYourGrammar is brought to you by Gird Center, your guide to correct grammar in English.

On Monday, we spoke about the differences between the verbs “BORNE” and “BORN.” We also mentioned that these words were not the same and therefore cannot be used interchangeably.

“BORNE” is the past participle of the verb “BEAR”; it is not related to birth. It means “carried, supported or endured.”

Example: “She has BORNE her neighbour’s constant nagging with incredible composure.”

“BORN” is a past tense, as well as a past participle, of the verb “BEAR.” Unlike “BORNE”, it is reserved for uses relating to birth.

Let us use “BORN” in a sentence: “Ghandi was born on 2nd October, 1869.”

“BORN” can be used as an adjective as well. For example:

“Kwame Nkrumah was a born leader.”

Here’s a hint for you:  The verb “BORNE” is unrelated to birth. It means “carried, supported or endured.”

The final lesson for the week was on finding out what Esi means when she says “BY ALL MISS/MAYS.”

Take a look at this example: Kwabea asks Esi if she will be able to make it for her birthday party.

Esi replies, “I have an exam that same day but don’t worry, I will be there by ALL MISS.”

What Esi is trying to say is “by all MEANS.” With this phrase, Esi seeks to reassure Kwabea that she will CERTAINLY make it for her birthday party.

In formal settings, it will be helpful to remember that the right word is “MEANS” not “MISS or MAYS.”

That’s all for the summary of the previous week’s WatchYourGrammar lessons. Enjoy the rest of the week.

THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR-~CHOP CHUCKLES~

Good morning, you’re welcome to the previous week’s summary of the topics that were discussed on WatchYourGrammar. Monday was ‘Eid, so WatchYourGrammar took the time off to mark the festivities with our Muslim friends and followers. On Wednesday, we discussed the actual meaning of the word “CHUCKLE.”

We learned that when people “CHUCKLE”, they laugh quietly or with restraint, probably because they don’t want others to hear them.

Example: “While Prof. Manu was speaking, Sena CHUCKLED at his odd accent.”

A “CHUCKLE” is not the ‘tsk tsk tsk’ sound some people make when they are infuriated, or in disapproval of an action. Always remember: a “CHUCKLE” is a soft, partly suppressed laugh.

Fridays are dedicated to “what does Esi mean when she says A or B.” So last Friday, we found out that Esi attended a wedding buffet. When she got back from the wedding, she told her husband: “I CHOPPED so much I could not breathe.”

What does Esi mean when she says “CHOP?” She means “EAT.” In Ghana, “CHOP” is an informal way of saying “EAT.” For example: “She CHOPPED all the food in the house; there was none left for her sister”

In formal settings, Esi ought to say “EAT” because “CHOP” is informal.

For example, “What did you EAT at yesterday’s staff meeting?”

That’s all for the summary of last week’s edition of WatchYourGrammar; see you again next week. Enjoy the rest of the week.

THIS WEEK ON WATCH YOUR GRAMMAR- ~MUCH I DO ABOUT STORYBOOKS~

Hello, did you know that the verb “AGREE” has at least 6 different meanings depending on the preposition it is used with? That was one of the things we learned on the previous week’s edition of Watch Your Grammar, brought to you by Gird Center. On Monday, we learned that there is a difference between the phrases “AGREE ON” and “AGREE TO”.

To “AGREE ON” a matter is to come to a settlement on how that matter should be handled. For example ‘The strike still continues. The government and the labour force could not “AGREE ON” a satisfactory minimum wage.’

On the other hand, to “AGREE TO” something is to give your consent or permission to a particular action. Example, ‘Mensah’s father AGREED TO let him sleep over at Braimoh’s house.’

Wednesday’s lesson was about the actual meaning of the noun “STORYBOOK”. A “STORYBOOK” is a book containing a collection of stories, especially for children. Books for young adults and adults can properly be referred to as a “NOVEL.”

The sentence “Chinua Achebe’s first STORYBOOK is Things Fall Apart” is not exactly correct. This is because the book in question is a novel.

Remember, a “STORYBOOK” is essentially a book of stories for children.

On Friday, our final lesson for the week, we discussed what it is Esi means when she says “much I DO about nothing”

The idiomatic expression “much ADO about nothing” means “A lot of fuss about something trivial.”

Idioms are often fixed in meaning; usually they cannot be changed at a whim to suit the speaker’s intent.

It will be incorrect for Esi to say “without MUCH I DO I will invite Aso to the table”.

The right expression is “MUCH ADO”, and not “MUCH I DO”.

That’s all for this week’s summary of the lessons that were discussed on Watch Your Grammar, enjoy the rest of the week.

THIS WEEK ON WATCHYOURGRAMMAR- ~A ‘PENSIONEER’ WITH ‘SWAG’~

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“Pensioneer”with a”swagger”

Hello, you welcome to our first summary of the lessons on WatchYourGrammar for the month of September.  WatchYourGrammar is brought to you by Gird Center, your guide to correct grammar in English.  Let’s start with the previous Monday’s lesson. Do you think there is any difference between these two sentences “Ama FELT sick yesterday” and   “Ama FELL sick yesterday?” These sentences have different meanings hence they cannot be used interchangeably.

This is because ‘FELL’ is the past tense of the verb ‘fall’ while ‘FELT’ is the past tense of the verb ‘feel’. Ama felt sick yesterday means Ama had the FEELING she was sick. On the other hand, Ama fell sick yesterday means Ama BECAME/GOT sick yesterday.

What answer will you give to the question “How did Ama feel after eating uncooked fish at Kwei’s party?”

On Wednesday, we took a look at the actual meaning of the noun “SWAGGER”. In slang, SWAGGER or “SWAG” often means knowing the trendiest fashion and styles. As a matter of fact, ‘SWAGGER’ means “a way of walking or behaving that shows you have a lot of confidence.”

Remember, ‘SWAGGER’ is not about wearing trendy clothes or being the coolest person. ‘SWAGGER’ is essentially a way of WALKING or ACTING in a confident manner.

Finally, we discussed the Ghanaianism “PENSIONEER”. Esi’s father is 68 years old. He is a former employee of the Volta River Authority. Esi calls her father a “PENSIONEER”. What does Esi really mean when she calls her father a “PENSIONEER”?

“PENSIONEER” is a Ghanaian way of saying “PENSIONER”. A “PENSIONER” is someone who benefits from a pension fund.  A pension is a regular payment that is made to someone with the intention of allowing them subsist without working #WatchYourGrammar

What Esi ought to say is “My father is a PENSIONER. He retired from work 8 years ago.”

Remember, outside casual Ghanaian usage, “PENSIONEER” is not a word; the correct word is “PENSIONER”.

That’s it for this week’s summary of WatchYourGrammar. Enjoy the rest of the week. #GirdCenter #WeWRITEWeEDITWeTRAIN